Permalink newyorker:

A cartoon by Paul Noth. Look through a slide show of more Roman-themed cartoons from our archive.
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Permalink did-you-kno:

Wisconsin native Sarah Kaufmann carves edible cheese sculptures out of massive blocks of cheddar.  Source
Permalink explore-blog:

Maurice Sendak's darkest, most controversial, yet most personal and most hopeful children’s book:

The book’s true magic lies in its integration of Sendak’s many identities — the son of Holocaust survivors, a gay man witnessing the devastation of AIDS, a deft juggler of darkness and light. 
St. Paul’s Bakery and Orphanage, where the story is set, is a horrible place reminiscent of Auschwitz. In the game of bridge, “diamonds are trumps,” a phrase with a poignant double meaning, subtly implicating the avarice of the world’s diamond-slingers and Donald Trumps in the systemic social malady of homelessness — something reflected in the clever wordplay of the book’s title itself, suggesting that homelessness isn’t limited to the homeless but is a problem we’re all in together, equally responsible for its solution.
Jack and Guy appear like a gay couple, and their triumph in rescuing the child resembles an adoption, two decades before that was an acceptable subject for a children’s book. “And we’ll bring him up / As other folk do,” the final pages read — and, once again, a double meaning reveals itself as two characters are depicted with wings on their backs, lifting off into the sky, lending the phrase “we’ll bring him up” an aura of salvation. In the end, the three curl up as a makeshift family amidst a world that is still vastly imperfect but full of love.

See more here.
Permalink thedogist:

Hudson, Australian Shepherd, McCarren Park, Brooklyn, NY
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Permalink humansofnewyork:

"Do you remember the proudest you’e ever been of your son?""The time he asked me to buy some tools so he could make his grandmother a bird feeder."
(Bila Tserkva, Ukraine)